Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens

Menü

Jens Wolf

Exhibitions

JENS WOLF PATTERN BOARDS

Klaus Merkel
For about ten years now, Jens Wolf decidedly executes his paintings as small-format, fully executed drafts, which he calls Pattern Boards. Their medium is always plywood in the format of 48 x 36 cm (36 x 48 cm), with their worked-on surfaces already showing all of the elements that are later transferred to larger sheets of plywood. The artist owns about 200 Pattern Boards, which are now presented for the first time — in a catalog and as an exhibition. They function as models for thought and/or action and as true role models for any further disposal. (1)

The Pattern Board has the quality of a matrix-like beginning that already contains all meticulous details of the future large-scale paintings. (2) Different decisions maintain distance and support or enact the body of work in its reproducible and repetitive nature. Jens Wolf works on standard sheets of plywood, in which the painting surface is untreated. As industrially produced wood products with grain, the boards possess their own natural space of clear objecthood. A linear skeleton of stencil is first applied to the plywood boards. Then form and color, delicate areas, bridges and curves reminiscent of marquetry are docked onto it in an elab­orate process of masking and cutting. In this way, the pictorial figure is clearly characterized and sharply separated from the surface. Each gestural painterly impulse is avoided. Wolf isolates his materials, builds up the image and assembles segments. The color palette is reduced. The paintings’ subject and medium are precisely coordinated and function as a sensitive pattern of figure and surface that optimally anchors the subject in space, whether to create a suggestion of emptiness or a kind of limbo. Virtually working in parallel, he adds to his abstract ciphers some quasi-realistic elements that complement his iconographic program: a broken line, a spot, a bulge, a blob, a false gloss, an irregularity or a slip. Any seemingly spontaneous randomness is a formal decision that within Jens Wolf’s system has to be repeatable or cloneable, whether it is ripped varnish, overpainted glue, gradient errors, compass circles, construction lines or sudden stops at the format’s border. They pull the paintings into the present. This working method prevents the painting’s simple geometric abstractions from snapping back into just another art history.

Jens Wolf’s way of painting operates in a strongly subjective manner. He subjects his purely decorative forms, as well as his fragmented interventions, to a certain dissolving — a method that necessarily puts the question of beauty under stress. By the act of recycling forms as an appropriated element, he takes along every move into the blow-ups. (3) Dead Undead, Minimalism and After, and Ultramoderne were three group exhibitions in which Jens Wolf was involved. Their titles represent the climatic context of the mid-and late 2000s, with its search for a renewable taste from a mixture of neo-formalism and the revival of earlier models of abstraction.(4)
For Jens Wolf, history is not completed — he presupposes the long chain of geometric abstraction as his aesthetic reference. He knows that he has to make use of his own aesthetic position — before he becomes a doppelganger. He also knows that these days subjective opinions are flexible and context-dependent and therefore subject to pretense and representations.

Now for the first time, the Pattern Boards are on display in almost their entirety. According to their place in Jens Wolf’s work, they are particularly suitable for thesis elongation and/or refocusing — by putting the work’s conceptual components in the forefront and by emphasizing the general availability of his paintings in repetition and magnification. Unlike his usual previous exhibition practice of combining work groups with large-scale paintings, he now organizes his archives as an exhibition of lines, rows and clusters. As a successful self-commentary, he merges the work’s genesis as a texture with the full painterly range. The bare wood color additionally creates a continuous naturalistic level and pushes the sand-colored plywood boards with their porous top layer into a timeline — visualizing the construct and the course of the work as a strip that contain the drafts stored as pictograms, letters or drilling cores.

Klaus Merkel (Translation: Sonja Engelhardt)


(1) Accordingly Pattern Boards would be sample boards, on which art and craft coincide and thus trigger idea, draft and repeated feasibility, ergo, reproduction. 
(2) Each design can currently be applied to four sizes: 80 x 60 cm (60 x 80 cm), 115 x 85 cm (85 x 115 cm), 195 x 140 cm (140 x 195 cm), 235 x 170 (170 x 235 cm).
(3) Low, Lower, Lowest Expectations are pop music quotes, live-playback performed by Angus Fairhurst—endlessly looped intros and lousy samples that put an abrupt end to the initial toe-tapping, because the music never really starts, but practically ends as a broken record. In his work, Fairhurst often talks about the fragile, melancholic status of the artist: samples as a keynote, mirroring, repetition, meandering in versions, reprocessing, arbitrariness of availability, cover versions, recycling and transference as artistic approaches, which at this point can be docked seamlessly to Jens Wolf’s model. 
(4) The exhibition Dead Undead, organized by Hans-Jürgen Hafner, was based on the observation that the exhibited works mostly function in terms of retro mechanisms—methods that partly reflect a formal aesthetic in the choice and treatment of materials or specific media or techniques and/or whose effects are visible on a thematic and contextual level.
Dead Undead, Galerie Six Friedrich Lisa Ungar, Munich 2004, Minimalism and After III, Daimler Chrysler Contemporary Collection, Berlin, 2005 and Ultramoderne, Espace Paul Wurth, Luxembourg, 2007.
The recourses to the 1980s (Neo-Geo, with John Armleder, Gerwald Rockenschaub or Heimo Zobernig) and at the same time the keyword-exhibition Formalism. Modern Art today, at Kunstverein Hamburg, 2004, was a clear attempt of a younger generation of artists to sound the bell for the end of the 2000s with a new definition of power. (In this exhibition, the headliners include—along many others: Tomma Abts, Carol Bove, Wade Guyton, Anselm Reyle or Katja Strunz). Moreover, Jens Wolf has exhibited with all of these artists in other contexts.

Read More

JENS WOLF PATTERN BOARDS

Klaus Merkel
Depuis une dizaine d’années, Jens Wolf élabore ses compositions au moyen de petites esquisses détaillées qu’il nomme Pattern Boards. Celles-ci ont pour support des planches de contreplaqué au format 48 x 36 cm (36 x 48 cm). Leurs surfaces accueillent tous les éléments picturaux qui sont par la suite transférés sur des planches de contreplaqué plus grandes. L’artiste possède ainsi près de 200 Pattern Boards, réunies dans une exposition et reproduites pour la première fois dans ce catalogue. Véritables précis de pensée et d’action, elles tiennent lieu de modèles se prêtant aux agencements ultérieurs. (1)

Le Pattern Board possède les qualités d’un premier jet matriciel qui, exécuté avec minutie, recèle déjà tous les détails du futur tableau. (2) Différentes décisions picturales, en opérant un distanciement, favorisent ou conditionnent l’œuvre de l’artiste, qui se caractérise par la reproduc­tibilité et la répétition. Jens Wolf utilise comme support pictural des planches de contreplaqué courantes non apprêtées. Avec leurs veinures, ces panneaux de bois industriels possèdent une structure naturelle qui les rapproche clairement de l’objet. Un squelette linéaire est alors appliqué au patron, auquel viennent s’accrocher, au moyen d’un procédé complexe de collage et de découpage, formes et couleurs, surfaces filigranes, traverses et courbes qui rappellent la marqueterie. Le motif pictural, en se détachant clairement du support, est ainsi délimité sans équivoque. Toute dynamique gestuelle est bannie. Jens Wolf isole son matériau, construit l’image et assemble des segments. Ce faisant, il utilise une palette réduite. L’image et le support s’accordent parfaitement, établissant un rapport sensible entre figure et arrière-plan qui ancre celle-ci dans l’espace, soit pour suggérer le vide, soit pour créer une sorte d’état d’apesanteur. Parallèlement s’ajoutent aux symboles abstraits des éléments quasiment réalistes qui complètent le programme pictural : une ligne brisée, une tache, un fléchissement, une fêlure, un faux reflet, une irrégularité, une erreur… Le moindre accident, aussi spontané qu’il puisse sembler, relève d’une décision formelle qui doit pouvoir être répétée ou clonée au sein du système Jens Wolf, qu’il s’agisse d’écaillures dans la laque, de débordements de peinture, de coulures, de cercles dessinés au compas, de traits d’esquisses ou de lignes brisées. Ce sont ces particularités qui ancrent ses tableaux dans le présent, en ce qu’elles empêchent ses abstractions géométriques de s’appuyer simplement sur l’histoire de l’art.

La peinture de Jens Wolf opère de manière résolument subjective. Ses formes purement décoratives, autant que ses interventions morcellantes, sont exposées à la dissolution au terme d’un procédé qui pose nécessairement la question de la beauté. Dans le recyclage des formes en tant que procédé d’appropriation, le peintre reporte cependant chaque mouvement sur ses agrandissements. (3)

Dead Undead, Minimalism and After et Ultramoderne sont trois expositions de groupe auxquelles il a participé. Leurs titres mêmes reflètent le contexte et le climat du milieu et de la fin des années 2000, avec leur quête d’un goût renouvelable mélangeant néo-formalisme et réactivation de modèles abstraits passés. (4) 

L’histoire chez Jens Wolf n’est pas finie, puisqu’il perpétue la longue tradition de l’abstraction géométrique, 
s’en servant comme d’une référence esthétique. Mais il sait qu’il doit affirmer sa propre position esthétique avant de copier. Il sait par ailleurs qu’aujourd’hui, tout avis subjectif est fluctuant et dépendant du contexte, ce qui explique qu’il soit sujet à des postures et des représentations.

Les Pattern Boards sont donc exposées pour la première fois dans leur ensemble. Conformément à leur statut dans l’œuvre de l’artiste, elles se prêtent tout particulièrement à une extension conceptuelle ou un recentrage, dans la mesure où elles mettent en avant les éléments conceptuels et soulignent leur disponibilité pour la répétition et l’agrandissement.

Contrairement à sa pratique d’exposition habituelle, qui consiste à mettre en regard des séries d’œuvres et des tableaux de grand format, Jens Wolf organise ici ses archives en lignes, rangées et clusters. Tel un commentaire autoréférentiel réussi, il entrelace la genèse de l’œuvre et l’ensemble du spectre pictural. L’aspect terne du bois articule un niveau « naturel » continu situant les planches de contreplaqué, avec leur couleur sable et leurs surfaces poreuses, dans un faisceau temporel qui fait apparaître la construction et le développement du travail comme une bande courante au sein de laquelle figurent les esquisses comme autant de pictogrammes, de lettres ou de carottes de forage.

Klaus Merkel (Traduction: Boris Kremer)

(1) Les Pattern Boards seraient dès lors des panneaux-échantillons où art et artisanat se confondent, c’est-
à-dire où idée, esquisse et reproductibilité confluent.
(2) Chaque ébauche peut être reportée sur quatre formats différents – 80 x 60 cm (60 x 80 cm); 115 x 85 cm (85 x 115 cm); 195 x 140 cm (140 x 195 cm) et 235 x 170 cm (170 x 235 cm).
(3) Sous le titre de Low, Lower, Lowest Expectations l’artiste anglais Angus Fairhurst donnait des performances live basées sur des citations de la musique pop : intros en boucle continue, samples décapants qui mettaient fin brutalement au dandinement du public, parce que la musique ne commençait pas vraiment, mais se terminait comme un disque rayé... Le travail d’Angus Fairhurst évoque toujours un statut d’artiste fragile et mélancolique : samples comme ton de base, réverbération, répétition, méandre, recyclage, arrangement arbitraire, reprise, recyclage et réenregistrement sont autant de procédés artistiques qui pourraient également désigner la pratique de Jens Wolf.
(4) Dead Undead, une exposition organisée par Hans-Jürgen Hafner, partait de l’observation que les œuvres exposées fonctionnaient surtout par rétro-mécanismes, c’est-à-dire par procédés qui se signalent dans l’esthétique des formes, le choix ou la manière d’utiliser les matériaux ou médias et/ou dont l’effet se manifeste dans le sujet ou le contenu.
Dead Undead, Galerie Six Friedrich Lisa Ungar, Munich, 2004, Minimalism and After III, Sammlung DaimlerChrysler Contemporary, Berlin, 2005, et Ultramoderne, Espace Paul Wurth, Luxembourg, 2007.) Avec des références aux années 80 (en particulier la peinture Néo-Géo avec John Armleder, Gerwald Rockenschaub ou Heimo Zobernig) et, sensiblement à la même époque, l’exposi­-tion-manifeste Formalismus. Moderne Kunst heute au Kunst­verein Hamburg en 2004, qui témoignait de la tentative d’une jeune génération d’artistes (parmi lesquels nous signalerons entre autres Tomma Abts, Carol Bove, Wade Guyton, Anselm Reyle et Katja Strunz, des artistes aux côtés desquels Jens Wolf a d’ailleurs exposé dans d’autres contextes) de marquer la fin des années 2000 en proposant de nouvelles définitions.

Read More

JENS WOLF PATTERN BOARDS

Klaus Merkel
Seit rund zehn Jahren entscheidet Jens Wolf seine Bilder in kleinformatigen, vollständig ausgeführten Entwürfen, die er Pattern Boards nennt. Der Träger ist immer Sperrholz im Format 48 x 36 cm (36 x 48 cm). Die bearbeiteten Flächen tragen bereits all jene Elemente, die dann auf größere Sperrholzplatten übertragen werden. Ungefähr 200 Pattern Boards hält der Künstler im Besitz, die hier im Katalog zum ersten Mal abgebildet sind und als Ausstellung gezeigt werden. Sie sind Denk-/Handlungs­modelle und echte Vorbilder für weitere Verfügungen. (1)

Das Pattern Board hat die Qualität eines matrixhaften Erstlings, der bereits minutiös jedwedes Detail künftiger großer Bilder trägt. (2) Verschiedene distanznehmende Entscheidungen begünstigen bzw. bedingen den reproduzierfähigen und repetitiv angelegten Werkkörper. Jens Wolf arbeitet auf handelsüblichen Sperrholzplatten. Der Malgrund ist unbehandelt. Die industriell gefertigten Tafeln besitzen als Holzprodukt mit ihrer Maserung einen natürlichen, eigenen Raum, der klaren Objekt­charakter hat. Ein lineares Skelett aus Schablonen wird auf die Sperrholzbretter aufgetragen, daran angedockt in aufwändiger Abklebe- und Schneideprozedur Form und Farbe, filigrane Flächen, Stege und Kurven, die an Intarsien erinnern. Dadurch wird die Bildfigur eindeutig charakterisiert und deutlich vom Bildträger getrennt. Jeder gestisch malerische Impuls wird vermieden. Er isoliert sein Material, konstruiert das Bild und fügt Segmente zusammen. Die Farbpalette ist reduziert. Motiv und Bildträger sind so präzise aufeinander abgestimmt und funktionieren als sensibler Figur-Grund-Rapport, der das Motiv im Raum optimal verankert, sei es um eine Suggestion der Leere oder eine Art Schwebezustand zu schaffen. In Parallelfahrt fügt er seinen abstrakten Chiffren quasi realistische Elemente zu, die sein Bildprogramm komplettieren: eine gebrochene Linie, ein Fleck, eine Ausbuchtung, ein Schnitzer, ein falscher Glanz, eine Unregelmäßigkeit oder Patzer. Jede noch so spontan scheinende Zufälligkeit ist eine formale Entscheidung, die im System Jens Wolf wiederholbar oder klonbar zu sein hat, seien es Ausrisse aus Lackierung, Kleberänderübermalungen, Farbverlaufsfehler, Zirkelkreise, Konstruktionslinien oder Abbrüche an Rändern. Sie zerren die Bilder in die Gegenwart. Und diese Machart ver­hindert, dass seine geometrischen Abstraktionen ein­-fach nach hinten in irgendeine Kunst-Geschichte zurückschnalzen können. 

Jens Wolfs Malerei operiert vehement subjektiv. Er setzt seine reinen Dekorformen ebenso wie seine fragmentierenden Eingriffe der Auflösung aus; ein Verfahren, das zwangsläufig die Fragen nach Schönheit stresst. Im Recycling der Formen als appropriatives Element nimmt er dennoch in die Blow-Ups jede Bewegung mit. (3)

Dead Undead, Minimalism and After oder Ultramoderne waren drei Gruppenausstellungen, an denen Jens Wolf beteiligt war. Sie zeigen in ihren jeweiligen Titeln den klimatischen Rahmen der mittleren und späten 2000er Jahre mit der Suche nach einem erneuerbaren Geschmack aus einem Gemisch aus Neo-Formalismus 
und dem Wiederbeleben früherer Abstraktionsmodelle. (4)

Geschichte ist bei Jens Wolf nicht abgeschlossen, er setzt die lange Kette der geometrischen Abstraktion 
voraus. Sie ist ihm ästhetische Referenz. Er weiß, dass seine eigene ästhetische Position mit ins Spiel muss bevor er Doppelgänger wird. Auch weiß er, dass subjektive Meinung heute beweglich und kontextabhängig 
ist und deshalb Posen und Repräsentationen unterliegt.

Die Pattern Boards sind jetzt zum ersten Mal nahezu in Gänze ausgestellt. Entsprechend ihrem Rang in Jens Wolfs Werk eignen sie sich besonders zur Thesendehnung und/oder Neufokussierung, in dem sie die konzeptuellen Anteile der Arbeit nach vorn stellen und die generelle Verfügbarkeit über seine Bilder in Repetition und Ver­größerung betonen. Im Unterschied zu seiner bisherigen Ausstellungspraxis, in der meist Werkgruppen mit großformatigen Bildern in Beziehung gesetzt waren, organisiert er hier sein Archiv als Ausstellung in Zeilen, Reihen und Clustern. Wie ein gelungener Selbstkommentar bringt er die Werkgenese als Textur mit dem gesamten malerischen Spektrum zusammen. Der blanke Holzton schafft zusätzlich eine durchlaufende naturhafte Ebene und schiebt die sandfarbenen Sperrholzbretter mit ihrer porösen Oberschicht in einen Zeitstrahl, der Konstrukt und Lauf der Arbeit als Band zeigt, in dem die Entwürfe abgespeichert wie Piktogramme, Buchstaben oder Bohrkerne sitzen.

Klaus Merkel

(1) Pattern Boards wären demnach Musterbretter, wo Kunst und Handwerk in eins fällt, d.h. Idee, Entwurf und wiederholte Machbarkeit, also Reproduktion, antriggern. 

(2) Jeder Entwurf lässt sich auf bisher vier Formate übertragen: 80 x 60 cm (60 x 80 cm); 115 x 85 cm (85 x 115 cm); 195 x 140 cm (140 x 195 cm), 235 x 170 cm (170 x 235 cm).

(3) Low, Lower, Lowest Expectations sind live-playback-performte Pop-Musik-Zitate von Angus Fairhurst. Dauergeloopte Intros, ätzende Samples, die dem anfänglichen Mitwippen ein jähes Ende bereiten, weil die Musik 
nicht wirklich einsetzt, sondern quasi als Sprung in der Platte endet. In seiner Arbeit spricht Fairhurst immer vom fragilen, melancholischen Künstlerstatus: Samples als Grundton, Spiegelung, Wiederholung, Mäandern in 
Versionen, Wiederverwertung, Willkür der Verfügung, Coverversionen, Recycling, Überschreibung sind künstlerische Ansätze die an dieser Stelle nahtlos an Jens Wolfs Arbeitsmodell angedockt werden können. 

(4) Dead Undead, eine von Hans-Jürgen Hafner einge­richtete Schau basierte auf der Beobachtung, dass die gezeigten Arbeiten vor allem über Retro-Mechanismen funktionieren: d.h. Verfahren, die sich einerseits formalästhetisch, in der Wahl bzw. im Umgang mit Materialien oder jeweiligen Medien bzw. Techniken abbilden und/ oder deren Wirkung auf der thematisch-inhaltlichen Ebene sichtbar werden. 
Dead Undead, Galerie Six Friedrich Lisa Ungar, München 2004, Minimalism and After III, Sammlung Daimler Chrysler Contemporary, Berlin, 2005 und Ultramoderne, Espace Paul Wurth, Luxembourg, 2007. 
Mit Rückgriffen in die 1980er Jahre (Neo Geo, mit John Armleder, Gerwald Rockenschaub oder Heimo Zobernig) sowie zeitgleich etwa die Schlagwortausstellung Formalismus. Moderne Kunst, heute, im Kunstverein Hamburg, 2004, der ein klarer Versuch einer jüngeren Künstler­generation war, das Ende der 2000er Jahre mit neuer Definitionsmacht einzuläuten (hierher gehören in jener Ausstellung neben zahlreichen anderen: Tomma Abts, Carol Bove, Wade Guyton, Anselm Reyle oder Katja Strunz), Künstlerinnen und Künstler übrigens, mit denen Jens Wolf in anderen Zusammenhängen auch ausgestellt hat. 

Read More

Biography

1967 born in Heilbronn
1994–2000 Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste Karlsruhe (classes of Helmut Dorner and Luc Tuymans)
2001 Landesgraduiertenstipendium der Staatlichen Akademie der Bildenden Künste Karlsruhe
2003 Stipendium Künstlerstätte Bleckede
Lives and works in Berlin

Solo exhibitions

2017
Risse in der Wirklichkeit (with Gavin Turk), Marta Herford/Germany

2016
System 7, Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens, Cologne
Constructed Identities, Städtische Galerie, Waldkraiburg

2015
Wallwork #17, Kunstverein am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, Berlin
Untitled Miami Beach, Ronchini Gallery, London
Nosbaum & Reding Art Contemporain, Luxemburg
Ronchini Gallery, London

2013
Galerie MaxWeberSixFriedrich, Munich
Kunstverein Schwäbisch Hall

2012
Pattern Boards, Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens, Cologne
Nosbaum & Reding Art Contemporain, Luxemburg

2011
Galerie MaxWeberSixFriedrich, Munich

2010
Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens, Cologne
Galerie Aline Vidal, Paris
Aschenbach & Hofland Galleries, Amsterdam
Charim Galerie, Wien

2009
Galerie von Bartha Garage, Basel
Nosbaum & Reding Art Contemporain, Luxemburg
2008
Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens, Cologne
Galerie Six Friedrich Lisa Ungar, Munich
Galerie Charim Ungar Contemporary, Berlin
Galerie Aline Vidal, Paris

2007
Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens, Cologne
Aschenbach & Hofland Galleries, Amsterdam

2006
Galerie Six Friedrich Lisa Ungar, Munich
Nosbaum & Reding Art Contemporain, Luxemburg
Galerie Jan Wentrup, Berlin

2005
Galerie Aline Vidal, Paris
Le Grand Café Centre d’art Contemporain, Saint-Nazaire Frankreich
Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens, Cologne
Aschenbach & Hofland Galleries, Amsterdam
Galerie Aliceday, Brüssel

2004
Galerie Hammelehle und Ahrens, Cologne
Galerie k4, Munich
Galerie Aline Vidal, Paris
Ausstellungsraum Ursula Werz, Tübingen
Art Brussels (One man show), Brüssel

2003
Nosbaum & Reding Art Contemporain, Luxemburg

2001
Galerie Maschenmode, Berlin
Ausstellungsraum UBERBAU, Düsseldorf
Galerie Maximilian Krips, Cologne
 


Group exhibitions

2016
The Berlin Case, Boris Yeltsin Center, Ekaterinburg, Russia
Wendezeiten, KUNSTHALLE CCA Andratx, Mallorca

2015
Zwischennutzung, Galerie MaxWeberSixFriedrich, Munich
Orange, Gerhard Hofland Gallery, Amsterdam
Avantgarde Mecanique – Hommage à Franciska Clausen, Kunsthalle PLU41, Berlin 

2014
silence and outbreak, Galerie Ruth Leuchter, Düsseldorf
P79, Galerie MaxWeberSixFriedrich, Munich
All that matters is what’s left behind, Ronchini Gallery, London
L’art est une construction, FRAC Languedoc-Roussillon, Montpellier, Frankreich
Jens Wolf / Wolfgang Flad, Ausstellungsraum Ursula Werz, Brandenburg an der Havel
FRAGEN WAGEN – ZUSAMMENSTÖSSE MIT DER SAMMLUNG MARTA, MARTa Herford, Herford
Brouhaha, GalerieMaxWeberSixFriedrich, Burg Gudenau, Wachtberg
schwarzweissich, GLUE im Kunstraum Kreuzberg / Projektraum Bethanien, Berlin
PRESENT, Kunstraum Kreuzberg / Projektraum Bethanien, Berlin
Collection Gilles Balmet, L’Ecole supérieure d’art et Design,Grenoble/ 
VOG art Center, Fontaine, Frankreich 
Der Garten der Pfade die sich verzweigen.II“, l’oiseau présente, Ballhaus Ost, Berlin

2013
2000+ Neu im Saarlandmuseum, Saarlandmuseum, Moderne Galerie, Saarbrücken
crossing lines, Galerie Ruth Leuchter, Düsseldorf
Une tradition matérielle, FRAC Poitou-Charantes, Angoulême
Gilles Balmet Collection, Medusa Caravage Salon, Galerie Dominique Fiat, Paris
Raum, tête, Berlin
Resonanzen / Skulptur – Malerei – Fotografie, Abtart, Stuttgart
Papierarbeiten II – Siebziger Jahre bis Heute, Galerie MaxWeberSixFriedrich, Munich
A time of gifts / Die Zeit der Gaben, Märkisches Museum, Witten
30 ans des FRAC, FRAC Poitou-Charantes, Angoulême
30 ans des FRAC, Musée Sainte-Croix, Poitiers
30 ans des FRAC, Musée des Arts du Cognac, Cognac

2012
Alternative Entrance, Kunstbunker, Nürnberg
Berlin Non Objective, SNO contemporary art Projects, Sydney
tracing paper, Charim Galerie, Wien
formal?, Galerie MaxWeberSixFriedrich, Munich
Against Interpretation, Whatspace, Tilburg, Niederlande
Choses vues a Droite et a Gauche (sans lunettes), Ballhaus Ost, Berlin

2011
Out of Storage / Provisoire & Définitif. Collection FRAC Nord-Pas de Calais, Marres Maastricht, Timmerfabriek, Maastricht
Tendenz Progressiv, GLUE@SCHAUFENSTER, Berlin
10 Años del Programa de Residencias – La Colección del CCA Andratx, 2001 – 2011, KUNSTHALLE, CCA Andratz, Mallorca
Kraftwerk Depot. Frisch ausgepackt – Wie Kunst altert, MARTa Herford, Herford
Künstlerische Produktionen, Espace Surplus, Berlin
Bild und Träger und ein Pfeiler im Park Sanssouci, Kurator: Hans-Jürgen Hafner, Brandenburgischer Kunstverein, Potsdam
The Visitation, Galerie Hartwich, Rügen
Real Fiction, Centre de Sculpture romane de Cabestany, FRAC Languedoc-Roussillon, Frankreich

2010
Electro Géo, FRAC Limousin, Limoges, Frankreich
Corridor, Galerie Oechsner, Nürnberg
BABEL, FRAC Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, Frankreich
Bilder über Bilder: Diskursive Malerei von Albers bis Zobernig aus der Daimler Kunst Sammlung, MUMOK Museum Moderner Kunst, Wien 
Mixed, Märkisches Museum, Witten / Brandenburgischer Kunstverein, Potsdam
Groupshow Galerie von Bartha Garage, Basel
Ich weiß gar nicht, was Kunst ist. Einblicke in eine private Sammlung, MARTa Herford, Herford

2009
1948, Aschenbach & Hofland Galleries, Amsterdam
(Z)ART, Kurator: Jan Hoet, Galerie Abtart, Stuttgart
private view, Städtische Galerie, Villingen-Schwenningen
La Rose Pourpre du Caire, Musée d’Art et d’Archélogie, Aurillac Frankreich
Hellwach Gegenwärtig – Ausblicke auf die Sammlung Marta, MARTA Herford, Herford
About Op Art, Galerie von Bartha, Chesa Chanf Schweiz
The Source of Inspiration, Galerie von Bartha Garage, Basel
Cave Painting, Kurator: Bob Nickas, PSM Galerie, Berlin
La Galerie Aline Vidal s’expose à Izmir, Centre Culture Français, Izmir
 
2008
Larsen, FRAC Poitoux-Charentes, Angoulême Frankreich
Roundabout, Contemporary Exhibition Place, Berlin
Something and Something else Museum van Bommel van Dam, Venlo Niederlande
Art Leaves Home: Otto L. Schaap, Content Art Consumer, Stedelijk Museum, Schiedam Niederlande
Plus de réalité – pratiques contemporaines de l’abstraction, Ecole régionale des Beaux-Arts de Nantes, Frankreich
Diskurs im Grünen, Kunstverein Springhornhof, Neuenkirchen
Seize, Ausstellungsraum Espace Surplus, Berlin
Ultramoderne, CAC Passerelle Brest Frankreich
I don’t wanna talk about it, Ausstellungsraum Glue, Berlin
Wenn ein Reisender in einer Winternacht – Variationen über Max Bill von Künstlern der Gegenwart , Kurator: Lorenzo Benedetti, MARTA Herford, Herford
 
2007
Space Chase, Galerie Magnus Müller, Berlin
Ultramoderne Espace Paul Wurth, Luxemburg
Aktuelle Positionen der abstrakten Malerei, Kunstverein Wilhelmshöhe, Ettlingen
summer show, Galerie Alice Day, Brüssel
New Generation, Galerie von Bartha Garage, Basel
de leur temps (2), Musée d’Art Contemporain, Grenoble
The best of... Galerie Aline Vidal, Paris
la couleur est une forme, Centre d’art Contemporain Bouvet-Ladubay, Saumur Frankreich
abstrakt, Ausstellungsraum 25, Zürich
our affects fly out of the field of human reality, Galerie Sandra Bürgel, Berlin
Groupshow, Galerie Almine Rech, Paris
 
2006
abstract art now – strictly geometrical?, Wilhelm-Hack-Museum, Ludwigshafen
Wir hätten das Land gerne weit und rund und Sie..., showroom, Berlin
Gtop8tä, Raum für Kunst, Kunstverein, Ravensburg
Kunstwille in M.Gladbach, MÖMA, Mönchengladbach
Heim, Wolf, Ausstellungsraum Glue, Berlin
 
2005
Liquid Crystal, Lothringer 13, Munich
Acid Rain, Kurator: Vincent Honoré, Galerie Michel Rein & Glassbox Paris
unburied/reburied, Kurator: Hans-Jürgen Hafner, Kunstbunker Nürnberg
Ça en jette!, Galerie Aline Vidal, Paris
dead/undead, Kurator: Hans-Jürgen Hafner, Galerie Six Friedrich Lisa Ungar, Munich
 
2004
La partie continue 2, Le Crédac , Centre d’art Contemporain, Ivry-sur-Seine
Regard sur l’abstraction dans la scène berlinoise, Nosbaum & Reding Art Contemporain, Luxemburg
1+1+1, Yuill/Crowley Gallery, Sydney
Welt ohne Gegenstände, Ausstellungsraum Glue, Berlin
Tenir le fil, garder la corde, FRAC Languedoc-Roussillon, Montpellier
Minimalism and After III, Sammlung Daimler Contemporary, Berlin
Obstractivist, Hales Gallery, London
 
2003
Gritsch, Pompl, Wolf, Galerie Maximilian Krips, Cologne
 
2002
Die Superzelle, Kino, Die Kamera, Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe
Sound, Ausstellungsraum G7, Berlin
Paintings and Sculptures, Galerie Maximilian Krips, Cologne
 
2001
Die Vertreibung der Händler aus dem Tempel, Kunstfabrik am Fluthafen, Berlin
 
2000
Queens, Queens Hotel, Karlsruhe
Genre Painting, Ausstellungsraum G7, Berlin
Sonderschau der Kunstakademie Karlsruhe, Kunst Köln 2000, Cologne

Publications

Jens Wolf
Jens Wolf
2015
Essay by Bob Nickas
26 x 21 cm, 52 pages
Exhibition catalogue Ronchini Gallery, London
Jens Wolf
Jens Wolf
2006
Essays by Hans-Jürgen Hafner, Arnauld Pierre
29,7 x 21 cm; 112 pages
Revolver Verlag, Frankfurt am Main
Exhibition catalogue Le Grand Café, St. Nazaire/F
Jens Wolf
Jens Wolf
2003
Essay by Gunter Reski
27 x 21 cm; 20 pages
Revolver Verlag, Frankfurt am Main
Exhibition catalogue Künstlerstätte Schloss Bleckede / Alimentation Generale Art Contemporain, Luxembourg
Painting Abstraction: New Elements in Abstract Painting
Painting Abstraction: New Elements in Abstract Painting
2014
Edited by Bob Nickas
english
29 x 24,7 cm; 352 pages
Paperback
Phaidon Press, London
Painting Abstraction: New Elements in Abstract Painting
Painting Abstraction: New Elements in Abstract Painting
2009
Edited by Bob Nickas
english
29 x 24,7 cm; 352 pages
Hardcover
Phaidon Press, London
Minimalism and After: Tradition and Tendencies of Minimalism from 1950 to today
Minimalism and After: Tradition and Tendencies of Minimalism from 1950 to today
2010
Edited by Renate Wiehager
27 x 22 cm; 632 pages
Daimler Art Collection
Hatje Cantz, Stuttgart 2010
DaimlerChrysler Collection – Minimalism and After III
DaimlerChrysler Collection – Minimalism and After III
2004
27 x 22 cm; 76 pages
Edited by Renate Wiehager
Exhibition catalogue DaimlerChrysler Contemporary
Abstract Art Now – Strictly Geometrical?
Abstract Art Now – Strictly Geometrical?
2006
Ed. Lida von Mengden, Theresia Kiefer
25,4 x 20 cm; 119 pages
Kerber Verlag, Bielefeld
Exhibition catalogue Wilhelm-Hack-Museum, Ludwigshafen
ZEITGENOSSENSCHAFT
ZEITGENOSSENSCHAFT
2012
Essays by Christoph Tannert and Dirk Steimann
Edited by Dirk Steimann
29,2 x 22 cm, 260 pages
Exhibition catalogue Märkisches Museum Witten:
DruckVerlag Kettler, Bönen
La Partie Continue 3
La Partie Continue 3
2005
Essay by Lili Reynaud-Dewar, p. 63–72
french/english
Edited by Le Crédac Centre d’Art Contemporain d’Ivry, Ivry-sur-Seine